The Food and Agriculture Organization and the World Health Organization have defined probiotics as: “live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit on the host”. Infection with HIV results in a defective immunological function of T cells and macrophages as well as in cytokine dysregulation with increased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Based on the capacity to stimulate immune and non-immune cells, probiotics may have anti-inflammatory effects. Both in vitro and in vivo studies have shown that probiotics may lower systemic inflammation, acting on Th1, Th2, Th17, Treg cell production, NK cell activity and cytokines production.

Probiotics and anti-inflammatory processes in HIV infection: from Benchside Research to Bedside

REALE, Marcella;FALASCA, KATIA
2017

Abstract

The Food and Agriculture Organization and the World Health Organization have defined probiotics as: “live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit on the host”. Infection with HIV results in a defective immunological function of T cells and macrophages as well as in cytokine dysregulation with increased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Based on the capacity to stimulate immune and non-immune cells, probiotics may have anti-inflammatory effects. Both in vitro and in vivo studies have shown that probiotics may lower systemic inflammation, acting on Th1, Th2, Th17, Treg cell production, NK cell activity and cytokines production.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11564/663883
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