In obese adults with non alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), treatment with Vitamin E has resulted in an improvement in liver histology, whereas variable and limited results are available in children. Our aim was to assess whether lifestyle combined with supplementation with Vitamin E might reduce oxidative stress and improve cardio-metabolic status in obese children with NAFLD. 24 obese prepubertal children (16M) followed a 6-month lifestyle intervention combined with Vitamin E supplementation (600 mg/day) and they were compared with 21 age and sex-matched obese peers who underwent lifestyle intervention only. At baseline and after 6-month urinary prostaglandin F2α (PGF-2α), endogenous secretory receptor for advanced glycation end products (esRAGE), high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), alanine aminotransferases (ALT), lipid profile, glucose, and insulin were assessed. The two groups were comparable for age (8.3 ± 1.6 vs 8.4 ± 1.3 yr), sex and BMI SDS (2.16 ± 0.29 vs 2.13 ± 0.28). At the beginning of the study, PGF2-α, esRAGE hsCRP, ALT, lipid profile and HOMA-IR levels were similar between the two groups (all p > 0.05). After 6-month treatment, levels of PGF2-α (p < 0.001) significantly decreased and esRAGE significantly increased (p < 0.001) in children treated with Vitamin E. A significant reduction was also found in ALT (p = 0.001), lipid profile and HOMA-IR (p < 0.001). In contrast, no significant change in any of these markers was detected in the lifestyle only group. In conclusion, Vitamin E supplementation was associated with a significant reduction in oxidative stress and improved cardio-metabolic alterations. These data suggest that Vitamin E supplementation could represent a valuable treatment in obese children affected by NAFLD

Improved oxidative stress and cardio-metabolic status in obese prepubertal children with liver steatosis treated with lifestyle combined with Vitamin E.

CHIARELLI, Francesco;MARCOVECCHIO, Maria Loredana;GIANNINI, COSIMO;DE GIORGIS, TOMMASO;CHIAVAROLI, VALENTINA;MOHN, Angelika Anna;D'ADAMO, EBE
2013-01-01

Abstract

In obese adults with non alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), treatment with Vitamin E has resulted in an improvement in liver histology, whereas variable and limited results are available in children. Our aim was to assess whether lifestyle combined with supplementation with Vitamin E might reduce oxidative stress and improve cardio-metabolic status in obese children with NAFLD. 24 obese prepubertal children (16M) followed a 6-month lifestyle intervention combined with Vitamin E supplementation (600 mg/day) and they were compared with 21 age and sex-matched obese peers who underwent lifestyle intervention only. At baseline and after 6-month urinary prostaglandin F2α (PGF-2α), endogenous secretory receptor for advanced glycation end products (esRAGE), high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), alanine aminotransferases (ALT), lipid profile, glucose, and insulin were assessed. The two groups were comparable for age (8.3 ± 1.6 vs 8.4 ± 1.3 yr), sex and BMI SDS (2.16 ± 0.29 vs 2.13 ± 0.28). At the beginning of the study, PGF2-α, esRAGE hsCRP, ALT, lipid profile and HOMA-IR levels were similar between the two groups (all p > 0.05). After 6-month treatment, levels of PGF2-α (p < 0.001) significantly decreased and esRAGE significantly increased (p < 0.001) in children treated with Vitamin E. A significant reduction was also found in ALT (p = 0.001), lipid profile and HOMA-IR (p < 0.001). In contrast, no significant change in any of these markers was detected in the lifestyle only group. In conclusion, Vitamin E supplementation was associated with a significant reduction in oxidative stress and improved cardio-metabolic alterations. These data suggest that Vitamin E supplementation could represent a valuable treatment in obese children affected by NAFLD
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11564/440340
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