Background Whether orthostatic hypotension (OH) is a risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity and death is uncertain. Currently available evidence derives from non-homogeneous and partly ambiguous studies. Objective We aimed at assessing the relationship between OH and death or major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular events (MACCEs) by integrating results of previous studies. Methods We performed a meta-analysis of prospective observational studies reporting on the association between prevalent OH, mortality, and incident MACCE, published from 1966 through 2013. Mantel-Haenszel pooled estimates of relative risk (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for all-cause death were assessed as the primary endpoint at the longest followup; incident coronary heart disease (CHD), heart failure (HF), and stroke were assessed as secondary endpoints. We also performed post hoc subgroup analyses stratified by age and a meta-regression analysis. Results We identified a total of 13 studies, including an overall population of 121 913 patients, with a median follow-up of 6 years. Compared with the absence of OH, the occurrence of OH was associated with a significantly increased risk of all-cause death (RR 1.50; 95% CI 1.24-1.81), incident CHD (RR 1.41; 95% CI 1.22-1.63), HF (RR 2.25; 95% CI 1.52-3.33), and stroke (RR 1.64; 95% CI 1.13-2.37). When analysed according to age, pooled estimates of RR (95% CI) for all-cause death were 1.78 (1.25-2.52) for patients < 65 years old, and 1.26 (0.99-1.62) in the older subgroup. Conclusion Orthostatic hypotension is associated with a significantly increased risk of all-cause death, incident CHD, HF, and stroke.

Cardiovascular morbidity and mortality related to orthostatic hypotension: A meta-analysis of prospective observational studies

Ricci, F.;DI NICOLA, MARTA;DE CATERINA, Raffaele
2015

Abstract

Background Whether orthostatic hypotension (OH) is a risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity and death is uncertain. Currently available evidence derives from non-homogeneous and partly ambiguous studies. Objective We aimed at assessing the relationship between OH and death or major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular events (MACCEs) by integrating results of previous studies. Methods We performed a meta-analysis of prospective observational studies reporting on the association between prevalent OH, mortality, and incident MACCE, published from 1966 through 2013. Mantel-Haenszel pooled estimates of relative risk (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for all-cause death were assessed as the primary endpoint at the longest followup; incident coronary heart disease (CHD), heart failure (HF), and stroke were assessed as secondary endpoints. We also performed post hoc subgroup analyses stratified by age and a meta-regression analysis. Results We identified a total of 13 studies, including an overall population of 121 913 patients, with a median follow-up of 6 years. Compared with the absence of OH, the occurrence of OH was associated with a significantly increased risk of all-cause death (RR 1.50; 95% CI 1.24-1.81), incident CHD (RR 1.41; 95% CI 1.22-1.63), HF (RR 2.25; 95% CI 1.52-3.33), and stroke (RR 1.64; 95% CI 1.13-2.37). When analysed according to age, pooled estimates of RR (95% CI) for all-cause death were 1.78 (1.25-2.52) for patients < 65 years old, and 1.26 (0.99-1.62) in the older subgroup. Conclusion Orthostatic hypotension is associated with a significantly increased risk of all-cause death, incident CHD, HF, and stroke.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11564/642980
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