Sedentary lifestyle is a risk factor for the development of cardiovascular disease, and leads to a quantifiable impairment in vascular function and arterial wall stiffening. We tested the hypothesis of oxidative stress as a determinant of arterial stiffness (AS) in physically inactive subjects, and challenged the reversibility of these processes after the completion of an eight-week, high-intensity exercise training (Er). AS was assessed before and after ET, measuring carotid to femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV) with a Vicorder device. At baseline and after ET, participants performed urine collection and underwent fasting blood sampling. Urinary 8-iso-PGF(2 alpha), an in vivo marker of lipid peroxidation, total, HDL and LDL cholesterol, and triglyceride concentrations were measured. ET was associated with significantly reduced urinary 8-iso-PGF(2 alpha)(p < 0.0001) levels. PWV was significantly reduced after ET completion (p < 0.0001), and was directly related to urinary 8-iso-PGF(2 alpha)(Rho = 0.383, p = 0.021). After ET, cardiovascular fitness improved [peak oxygen consumption (p < 0.0001), peak heart rate (p < 0.0001)]. However, no improvement in lipid profile was observed, apart from a significant reduction of triglycerides (p = 0.022). PWV and triglycerides were significantly related (Rho = 0.466, p = 0.005) throughout the study period. PWV levels were also related to urinary 8-iso-PGF(2 alpha) in our previously sedentary subjects. We conclude that regular physical exercise may be a natural antioxidant strategy, lowering oxidant stress and thereby the AS degree. (C) 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Arterial stiffness and sedentary lifestyle: Role of oxidative stress

SANTILLI, FRANCESCA;IODICE, PIERPAOLO;LIANI, ROSSELLA;TRIPALDI, ROMINA;SAGGINI, Raoul;DAVI', Giovanni
2016-01-01

Abstract

Sedentary lifestyle is a risk factor for the development of cardiovascular disease, and leads to a quantifiable impairment in vascular function and arterial wall stiffening. We tested the hypothesis of oxidative stress as a determinant of arterial stiffness (AS) in physically inactive subjects, and challenged the reversibility of these processes after the completion of an eight-week, high-intensity exercise training (Er). AS was assessed before and after ET, measuring carotid to femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV) with a Vicorder device. At baseline and after ET, participants performed urine collection and underwent fasting blood sampling. Urinary 8-iso-PGF(2 alpha), an in vivo marker of lipid peroxidation, total, HDL and LDL cholesterol, and triglyceride concentrations were measured. ET was associated with significantly reduced urinary 8-iso-PGF(2 alpha)(p < 0.0001) levels. PWV was significantly reduced after ET completion (p < 0.0001), and was directly related to urinary 8-iso-PGF(2 alpha)(Rho = 0.383, p = 0.021). After ET, cardiovascular fitness improved [peak oxygen consumption (p < 0.0001), peak heart rate (p < 0.0001)]. However, no improvement in lipid profile was observed, apart from a significant reduction of triglycerides (p = 0.022). PWV and triglycerides were significantly related (Rho = 0.466, p = 0.005) throughout the study period. PWV levels were also related to urinary 8-iso-PGF(2 alpha) in our previously sedentary subjects. We conclude that regular physical exercise may be a natural antioxidant strategy, lowering oxidant stress and thereby the AS degree. (C) 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11564/656151
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