The main reference for twentieth century politics is the Nation-state, whose territory-citizens were the unique and only target of norm production. Furthermore, the function of norm production was commitment of public bodies, whose legitimacy – at least in democratic countries – depends on the ‘people’. i.e. the citizens that were the target of the law production itself. An important fact, is that national production of norms slowly shifted from the legislative to the executive power. Too many were the decisions to be made in a brief term, and too fast were people’s emotional reactions, to let this commitment to an impersonal and procedural institution like the legislative power. In a globalized world, things have changed under many aspects. The multiplicity of decisional levels, e.g.: on one side, supranational bodies and entity are more and more frequently assuming this function; furthermore, more and more frequently, national commitments have shifted towards more restricted levels, such as regions or cities. Even the target has turned much more complex: due to more and more massive migration phenomena, all national law makings are nowadays affecting large groups of people, who are not citizens, while citizens are often subjected to other countries’ legislation. Among the main consequences, is that decisionmaking process have untied from contingent popular reactions and it is possible now to base upon legislative processes, a longterm perspective and a global scale. This paper aims at showing this scenario consequences for innovation processes. Namely, it is possible now to set an environment for innovation by enhancing exchanges of ideas, competences and information is the result of innovation processes, no matter if social or technological. In other words, their work will aim not only at comprehending the process of law-making in the global era, but also proposing models for law-making activities that grant the best environment possible for innovation processes, i.e. free circulation of ideas, science and people.

Legislative innovation. Towards a global law. Making process: the case of global citizenship policy modelling

Andrea Pitasi
;
2018

Abstract

The main reference for twentieth century politics is the Nation-state, whose territory-citizens were the unique and only target of norm production. Furthermore, the function of norm production was commitment of public bodies, whose legitimacy – at least in democratic countries – depends on the ‘people’. i.e. the citizens that were the target of the law production itself. An important fact, is that national production of norms slowly shifted from the legislative to the executive power. Too many were the decisions to be made in a brief term, and too fast were people’s emotional reactions, to let this commitment to an impersonal and procedural institution like the legislative power. In a globalized world, things have changed under many aspects. The multiplicity of decisional levels, e.g.: on one side, supranational bodies and entity are more and more frequently assuming this function; furthermore, more and more frequently, national commitments have shifted towards more restricted levels, such as regions or cities. Even the target has turned much more complex: due to more and more massive migration phenomena, all national law makings are nowadays affecting large groups of people, who are not citizens, while citizens are often subjected to other countries’ legislation. Among the main consequences, is that decisionmaking process have untied from contingent popular reactions and it is possible now to base upon legislative processes, a longterm perspective and a global scale. This paper aims at showing this scenario consequences for innovation processes. Namely, it is possible now to set an environment for innovation by enhancing exchanges of ideas, competences and information is the result of innovation processes, no matter if social or technological. In other words, their work will aim not only at comprehending the process of law-making in the global era, but also proposing models for law-making activities that grant the best environment possible for innovation processes, i.e. free circulation of ideas, science and people.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11564/696688
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