At the dawn of a peace process that closes more than fifty years of social, environmental, economic and military conflicts, the Colombian territory today shows to the external gaze all the legacies of a war long believed to be infinite. This is evident not only in the fragmentation of its structure, immediately in political-administrative terms, through its articulation in different territorial entities such as departments and municipalities, but also in relation to the prevailing imaginaries created around some marginal, peripheral and still "wild" regions, connected to the dynamics of the internal armed conflict that arose in the decades after 1950. A conflict on which significant expectations of solution are finally opened, following the signing of a peace agreement in 2016. In this context, it is possible to speak of a deep Colombia, understood as that national territory in which the State does not yet seem able to install and take root, as a set of relationships and relationships between populations and natural environments, and where the image itself of the nation and of the Colombian national identity is blurred because of the presence of different groups of populations, in the past subject to conflict and victims of armed conflict between groups and paramilitary forces, which include indigenous people, peasants and white settlers. Between the immensity of the jungle and south of one of the largest side rivers, the Guayabero, is located the municipality of San José del Guaviare, capital of one of the largest departments (regions) in the country. Nominally a city, the municipality is actually composed of a large rural area consisting of 87 ‘veredas’, one of which is Charrasquera, the subject of a recent international participatory planning workshop which is illustrated here as an experience of interest in the transition path to the fossil post ( and the overcoming of the cocalera economy) now underway in the territories of the Colombian post-conflict (infinity).

Transition paths to the post fossil (and to the overcoming of the cocalera economy) in the territories of the post-Colombian conflict. An ongoing experience of participated planning of new territorial futures in the Amazon verasas of S. Josè del Guaviare.

Piero Rovigatti
;
In corso di stampa

Abstract

At the dawn of a peace process that closes more than fifty years of social, environmental, economic and military conflicts, the Colombian territory today shows to the external gaze all the legacies of a war long believed to be infinite. This is evident not only in the fragmentation of its structure, immediately in political-administrative terms, through its articulation in different territorial entities such as departments and municipalities, but also in relation to the prevailing imaginaries created around some marginal, peripheral and still "wild" regions, connected to the dynamics of the internal armed conflict that arose in the decades after 1950. A conflict on which significant expectations of solution are finally opened, following the signing of a peace agreement in 2016. In this context, it is possible to speak of a deep Colombia, understood as that national territory in which the State does not yet seem able to install and take root, as a set of relationships and relationships between populations and natural environments, and where the image itself of the nation and of the Colombian national identity is blurred because of the presence of different groups of populations, in the past subject to conflict and victims of armed conflict between groups and paramilitary forces, which include indigenous people, peasants and white settlers. Between the immensity of the jungle and south of one of the largest side rivers, the Guayabero, is located the municipality of San José del Guaviare, capital of one of the largest departments (regions) in the country. Nominally a city, the municipality is actually composed of a large rural area consisting of 87 ‘veredas’, one of which is Charrasquera, the subject of a recent international participatory planning workshop which is illustrated here as an experience of interest in the transition path to the fossil post ( and the overcoming of the cocalera economy) now underway in the territories of the Colombian post-conflict (infinity).
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11564/700440
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