In this study, we investigated the relationship between pain and pancreatic pressure in patients with chronic pancreatitis (CP). We studied 12 patients with CP undergoing surgery and five controls with cancer of the pancreatic tail. CP was staged on the basis of morphological (ERP) and functional (serum-pancreolauryl test) criteria. Patients kept daily records of the intensity of pain on a linear analog scale. Intraoperatively, pressure within the pancreas was assessed by the introduction of a fine needle into the pancreatic parenchyma connected to a pressure transducer. In controls, pressure was determined in macroscopically normal tissue in the head of the pancreas. Pancreatic pressure was significantly higher in CP than in controls (29.9 +/- 3.1 vs 7.2 +/- 1.1 mmHg, p < 0.001). No relationship was found between the pain score and the pancreatic pressure. Pressure was positively correlated with ductal changes (r = 0.831; p < 0.001), but not with exocrine function of the pancreas. Postoperatively, pancreatic pressure fell by 15.3% in four patients with CP in whom pressure assessment was repeated after surgical decompression. We conclude that pancreatic parenchyma pressure is not closely related to pain in CP.

Is increased pancreatic pressure related to pain in chronic pancreatitis?

Di Sebastiano, P;
1994

Abstract

In this study, we investigated the relationship between pain and pancreatic pressure in patients with chronic pancreatitis (CP). We studied 12 patients with CP undergoing surgery and five controls with cancer of the pancreatic tail. CP was staged on the basis of morphological (ERP) and functional (serum-pancreolauryl test) criteria. Patients kept daily records of the intensity of pain on a linear analog scale. Intraoperatively, pressure within the pancreas was assessed by the introduction of a fine needle into the pancreatic parenchyma connected to a pressure transducer. In controls, pressure was determined in macroscopically normal tissue in the head of the pancreas. Pancreatic pressure was significantly higher in CP than in controls (29.9 +/- 3.1 vs 7.2 +/- 1.1 mmHg, p < 0.001). No relationship was found between the pain score and the pancreatic pressure. Pressure was positively correlated with ductal changes (r = 0.831; p < 0.001), but not with exocrine function of the pancreas. Postoperatively, pancreatic pressure fell by 15.3% in four patients with CP in whom pressure assessment was repeated after surgical decompression. We conclude that pancreatic parenchyma pressure is not closely related to pain in CP.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11564/709831
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