AIM OF THE STUDY To evaluate surgical team satisfaction among members of all robotic-assisted pediatric surgery (RAS) programs active in Italy. MATERIALS AND METHODS An anonymous individual 10-items survey was e-mailed to all staff members. First 5 questions related to role of responder and program itself (duration, frequency of procedures, autonomous surgeons, team structuring). Five further question (1-5 Likert-scale, 1=completely disagree, 5=completely agree) on personal interest, involvement, training in RAS, perceived value for hospital, personal growth limitation as MIS surgeon attributed to RAS. RESULTS 44/117 invited members (38%) participated (6 directors. 27 consultants, 11 trainees). Most programs provided 2procedures/months (93%) and single surgeon-leadership (61%). A significant difference among roles, with lower satisfaction for trainees, was evident for involvement, training, perceived value for the hospital (table). Surgeon operating in staff with long-lasting program (> 2 years) significantly perceived RAS as limiting personal growth as MIS compared to more recent programs (mean score±SD, respectively: 2.58±1.64 vs 1.6±1.04, p=0.02, t-test). CONCLUSIONS Leaders of active RAS program in our country have to deal with a low satisfaction rate of younger staff members, who should be subject to a more articulated training program. Low rotation of pediatric RAS procedures could negatively impact these results.

SURGICAL TEAM SATISFACTION IN ROBOTIC-ASSISTED PEDIATRIC SURGERY / UROLOGY: A NATIONAL SURVEY

G. Lisi;G. Lauriti;P. Lelli Chiesa
2019

Abstract

AIM OF THE STUDY To evaluate surgical team satisfaction among members of all robotic-assisted pediatric surgery (RAS) programs active in Italy. MATERIALS AND METHODS An anonymous individual 10-items survey was e-mailed to all staff members. First 5 questions related to role of responder and program itself (duration, frequency of procedures, autonomous surgeons, team structuring). Five further question (1-5 Likert-scale, 1=completely disagree, 5=completely agree) on personal interest, involvement, training in RAS, perceived value for hospital, personal growth limitation as MIS surgeon attributed to RAS. RESULTS 44/117 invited members (38%) participated (6 directors. 27 consultants, 11 trainees). Most programs provided 2procedures/months (93%) and single surgeon-leadership (61%). A significant difference among roles, with lower satisfaction for trainees, was evident for involvement, training, perceived value for the hospital (table). Surgeon operating in staff with long-lasting program (> 2 years) significantly perceived RAS as limiting personal growth as MIS compared to more recent programs (mean score±SD, respectively: 2.58±1.64 vs 1.6±1.04, p=0.02, t-test). CONCLUSIONS Leaders of active RAS program in our country have to deal with a low satisfaction rate of younger staff members, who should be subject to a more articulated training program. Low rotation of pediatric RAS procedures could negatively impact these results.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11564/710371
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