Background: Global Proprioceptive Resonance (GPR) is a recently developed approach specifically conceived to solicit the various cutaneous mechanoreceptors, through application of mechanical multifocal vibration at low amplitude and at definite body sites, limiting the stimulation of the profound structures. Methods: This interventional study evaluated the effects of GPR on cardiorespiratory function during the post-exertional recovery period. A group of volunteers involved in long-lasting maximal aerobic/ anaerobic exercise competitions, Triathlon, underwent two maximal incremental exercise tests until exhaustion followed alternatively to (a) a 13 minutes section of GPR or (b) a standard low intensity exercise recovery period of the same duration. These effects of these two approaches were compared in terms of recovery of: heart rate, respiratory rate, peripheral oxygen saturation and venous lactate concentration. Results: The two exercise sections were similar among the 40 volunteers with regard to the explored variables. On the contrary, several differences were recorded in the post-exertion phase. After 6 min of GPR recovery it was recorded a drop in respiratory rate below baseline (19.4±4.15 min-1 vs. 12.2± 0.4 min-1; p<0.001) coupled with an increase in peripheral oxygen saturation above the baseline (GPR: 99.0%±0.16% vs. 96.6%±0.77%, p<0.001). Moreover, the most striking result was the drop in lactate concentration measured after 13 min of GPR recovery: 84.5±3.5% in GPR vs 2.9±7.6% reduction in standard recovery (p<0.001). Notably no differences were recorded recovery of heart rate. Conclusions: GPR has promising effects on post-exercise recovery on RR, SpO2 and lactate level on young athletes.

Effects of a vibrational proprioceptive stimulation on recovery phase after maximal incremental cycle test

Coscia F
;
Pietrangelo T;Verratti V;Fanò-Illic G
2019

Abstract

Background: Global Proprioceptive Resonance (GPR) is a recently developed approach specifically conceived to solicit the various cutaneous mechanoreceptors, through application of mechanical multifocal vibration at low amplitude and at definite body sites, limiting the stimulation of the profound structures. Methods: This interventional study evaluated the effects of GPR on cardiorespiratory function during the post-exertional recovery period. A group of volunteers involved in long-lasting maximal aerobic/ anaerobic exercise competitions, Triathlon, underwent two maximal incremental exercise tests until exhaustion followed alternatively to (a) a 13 minutes section of GPR or (b) a standard low intensity exercise recovery period of the same duration. These effects of these two approaches were compared in terms of recovery of: heart rate, respiratory rate, peripheral oxygen saturation and venous lactate concentration. Results: The two exercise sections were similar among the 40 volunteers with regard to the explored variables. On the contrary, several differences were recorded in the post-exertion phase. After 6 min of GPR recovery it was recorded a drop in respiratory rate below baseline (19.4±4.15 min-1 vs. 12.2± 0.4 min-1; p<0.001) coupled with an increase in peripheral oxygen saturation above the baseline (GPR: 99.0%±0.16% vs. 96.6%±0.77%, p<0.001). Moreover, the most striking result was the drop in lactate concentration measured after 13 min of GPR recovery: 84.5±3.5% in GPR vs 2.9±7.6% reduction in standard recovery (p<0.001). Notably no differences were recorded recovery of heart rate. Conclusions: GPR has promising effects on post-exercise recovery on RR, SpO2 and lactate level on young athletes.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11564/710823
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