Background:Metabolic syndrome (MetS) has been associated with colorectal adenomas and cancer. However, MetS definitions have changed over time, leading to a heterogeneity of patients included in previous studies and a substantial inextensibility of observations across time or eastern and western populations. Our aim was to evaluate the association of 'harmonized' criteria-defined MetS and its individual components with colorectal neoplasia and cancer in a western population. Methods:In this multicenter, cross-sectional study, we prospectively evaluated consecutive outpatients who underwent open-access colonoscopy over a 3-month period. MetS was diagnosed according to the 2009 'harmonized' criteria. Results:Out of 5707 patients enrolled, we found 213 cancers (3.7%), 1614 polyps (28.3%), 240 nonpolypoid lesions (4.2%), 95 laterally spreading tumors (1.6%). Polyps presented histological low-grade dysplasia in 72.9% of samples, while in 9.8%, high-grade dysplasia or in situ carcinoma was present; dysplasia rates for nonpolypoid lesions were 66.2% (low-grade) and 2.9% (high-grade/in situ carcinoma), while for laterally spreading tumors, 29.6% and 37%, respectively. Overall, MetS prevalence was 41.6%. MetS correlated with both adenomas [odds ratio (OR): 1.76, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.54-2.00] and cancer (OR: 1.92, 95% CI 1.42-2.58). MetS was the only risk factor for such colonic lesions in subjects younger than 50 years. For all colonic neoplasia, we found MetS and not its individual components to be significantly associated. Conclusions:MetS is risk factor for cancer and adenoma in Whites, especially when younger than 50 years. MetS patients might be considered as a high-risk population also in colorectal cancer screening programs.

Metabolic syndrome is a risk factor for colorectal adenoma and cancer: a study in a White population using the harmonized criteria

Efthymakis K.;Neri M.
2019

Abstract

Background:Metabolic syndrome (MetS) has been associated with colorectal adenomas and cancer. However, MetS definitions have changed over time, leading to a heterogeneity of patients included in previous studies and a substantial inextensibility of observations across time or eastern and western populations. Our aim was to evaluate the association of 'harmonized' criteria-defined MetS and its individual components with colorectal neoplasia and cancer in a western population. Methods:In this multicenter, cross-sectional study, we prospectively evaluated consecutive outpatients who underwent open-access colonoscopy over a 3-month period. MetS was diagnosed according to the 2009 'harmonized' criteria. Results:Out of 5707 patients enrolled, we found 213 cancers (3.7%), 1614 polyps (28.3%), 240 nonpolypoid lesions (4.2%), 95 laterally spreading tumors (1.6%). Polyps presented histological low-grade dysplasia in 72.9% of samples, while in 9.8%, high-grade dysplasia or in situ carcinoma was present; dysplasia rates for nonpolypoid lesions were 66.2% (low-grade) and 2.9% (high-grade/in situ carcinoma), while for laterally spreading tumors, 29.6% and 37%, respectively. Overall, MetS prevalence was 41.6%. MetS correlated with both adenomas [odds ratio (OR): 1.76, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.54-2.00] and cancer (OR: 1.92, 95% CI 1.42-2.58). MetS was the only risk factor for such colonic lesions in subjects younger than 50 years. For all colonic neoplasia, we found MetS and not its individual components to be significantly associated. Conclusions:MetS is risk factor for cancer and adenoma in Whites, especially when younger than 50 years. MetS patients might be considered as a high-risk population also in colorectal cancer screening programs.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11564/713386
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