OBJECTIVE: The role of high-flow nasal cannula during and before intubation is unclear despite a number of randomized clinical trials. Our objective was to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis examining the benefits of high-flow nasal cannula in the peri-intubation period. DATA SOURCES: We performed a comprehensive search of relevant databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Web of Science). STUDY SELECTION: We included randomized clinical trials that compared high-flow nasal cannula to other noninvasive oxygen delivery systems in the peri-intubation period. DATA EXTRACTION: Our primary outcome was severe desaturation (defined as peripheral oxygen saturation reading < 80% during intubation). Secondary outcomes included peri-intubation complications, apneic time, PaO2 before and after intubation, PaCO2 after intubation, ICU length of stay, and short-term mortality. DATA SYNTHESIS: We included 10 randomized clinical trials (n = 1,017 patients). High-flow nasal cannula had no effect on the occurrence rate of peri-intubation hypoxemia (relative risk, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.68-1.42; 0.3% absolute risk reduction, moderate certainty), serious complications (relative risk, 0.87; 95% CI, 0.71-1.06), apneic time (mean difference, 10.3 s higher with high-flow nasal cannula; 95% CI, 11.0 s lower to 31.7 s higher), PaO2 measured after preoxygenation (mean difference, 3.6 mm Hg higher; 95% CI, 3.5 mm Hg lower to 10.7 mm Hg higher), or PaO2 measured after intubation (mean difference, 27.0 mm Hg higher; 95% CI, 13.2 mm Hg lower to 67.2 mm Hg higher), when compared with conventional oxygen therapy. There was also no effect on postintubation PaCO2, ICU length of stay, or 28-day mortality. CONCLUSIONS: We found moderate-to-low certainty evidence that the use of high-flow nasal cannula likely has no effect on severe desaturation, serious complications, apneic time, oxygenation, ICU length of stay, or overall survival when used in the peri-intubation period when compared with conventional oxygen therapy.

Moderate Certainty Evidence Suggests the Use of High-Flow Nasal Cannula Does Not Decrease Hypoxia When Compared With Conventional Oxygen Therapy in the Peri-Intubation Period: Results of a Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

Maggiore, Salvatore M;
2020

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The role of high-flow nasal cannula during and before intubation is unclear despite a number of randomized clinical trials. Our objective was to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis examining the benefits of high-flow nasal cannula in the peri-intubation period. DATA SOURCES: We performed a comprehensive search of relevant databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Web of Science). STUDY SELECTION: We included randomized clinical trials that compared high-flow nasal cannula to other noninvasive oxygen delivery systems in the peri-intubation period. DATA EXTRACTION: Our primary outcome was severe desaturation (defined as peripheral oxygen saturation reading < 80% during intubation). Secondary outcomes included peri-intubation complications, apneic time, PaO2 before and after intubation, PaCO2 after intubation, ICU length of stay, and short-term mortality. DATA SYNTHESIS: We included 10 randomized clinical trials (n = 1,017 patients). High-flow nasal cannula had no effect on the occurrence rate of peri-intubation hypoxemia (relative risk, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.68-1.42; 0.3% absolute risk reduction, moderate certainty), serious complications (relative risk, 0.87; 95% CI, 0.71-1.06), apneic time (mean difference, 10.3 s higher with high-flow nasal cannula; 95% CI, 11.0 s lower to 31.7 s higher), PaO2 measured after preoxygenation (mean difference, 3.6 mm Hg higher; 95% CI, 3.5 mm Hg lower to 10.7 mm Hg higher), or PaO2 measured after intubation (mean difference, 27.0 mm Hg higher; 95% CI, 13.2 mm Hg lower to 67.2 mm Hg higher), when compared with conventional oxygen therapy. There was also no effect on postintubation PaCO2, ICU length of stay, or 28-day mortality. CONCLUSIONS: We found moderate-to-low certainty evidence that the use of high-flow nasal cannula likely has no effect on severe desaturation, serious complications, apneic time, oxygenation, ICU length of stay, or overall survival when used in the peri-intubation period when compared with conventional oxygen therapy.
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
2020 Moderate evidence suggests HFNC does not decrease hypoxia compared with O2 in peri-intubation period-Review & meta-analysis (CCM-Chaudhuri...SMM).pdf

Solo gestori archivio

Descrizione: Articolo principale
Tipologia: Documento in Pre-print
Dimensione 987.74 kB
Formato Adobe PDF
987.74 kB Adobe PDF   Visualizza/Apri   Richiedi una copia

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11564/714211
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 0
  • Scopus 17
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 14
social impact