Purpose Selective IgA deficiency (SIgAD) is the most common humoral primary immunodeficiency. Long-term follow-up data in large cohort of pediatric patients are scarce. Methods We report on a single-center cohort of 184 pediatric patients affected with selective IgA deficiency and describe the characteristics at diagnosis and during follow-up. Results Respiratory infections were the most common clinical finding leading to the initial diagnosis (62%). Positive family history for antibody deficiencies (selective IgA deficiency, common variable immunodeficiency) led to SIgAD diagnosis in 16% of cases. During follow-up, while the incidence of respiratory infections was not particularly high, gastrointestinal symptoms were reported in 27% of patients. Allergic manifestations were found in 23% at diagnosis and an additional 16% of patients during follow-up, leading to a prevalence of atopy of 39% among SIgAD patients. Autoimmune manifestations, excluding celiac disease, were found in 9% of affected patients during follow-up. Celiac disease was found in a high prevalence (14%). Increase of serum IgA levels to partial deficiency (9%) and normal serum levels for age (4%) was observed during follow-up. A small percentage of patients (2%) progressed to common variable immunodeficiency (CVID). Conclusions In conclusion, this is the first study to describe a large single-center pediatric cohort of patients affected with SIgAD, revealing that overall most patients do well with regard to infections. Many develop CD, at a rate much higher than the general population. A few normalize their IgA levels. A few progress to CVID. Thus, careful follow-up is suggested to diagnose and treat potential complications earlier for avoiding potential morbidities.

Clinical and Laboratory Features of 184 Italian Pediatric Patients Affected with Selective IgA Deficiency (SIgAD): a Longitudinal Single-Center Study

Gualdi G.;
2019

Abstract

Purpose Selective IgA deficiency (SIgAD) is the most common humoral primary immunodeficiency. Long-term follow-up data in large cohort of pediatric patients are scarce. Methods We report on a single-center cohort of 184 pediatric patients affected with selective IgA deficiency and describe the characteristics at diagnosis and during follow-up. Results Respiratory infections were the most common clinical finding leading to the initial diagnosis (62%). Positive family history for antibody deficiencies (selective IgA deficiency, common variable immunodeficiency) led to SIgAD diagnosis in 16% of cases. During follow-up, while the incidence of respiratory infections was not particularly high, gastrointestinal symptoms were reported in 27% of patients. Allergic manifestations were found in 23% at diagnosis and an additional 16% of patients during follow-up, leading to a prevalence of atopy of 39% among SIgAD patients. Autoimmune manifestations, excluding celiac disease, were found in 9% of affected patients during follow-up. Celiac disease was found in a high prevalence (14%). Increase of serum IgA levels to partial deficiency (9%) and normal serum levels for age (4%) was observed during follow-up. A small percentage of patients (2%) progressed to common variable immunodeficiency (CVID). Conclusions In conclusion, this is the first study to describe a large single-center pediatric cohort of patients affected with SIgAD, revealing that overall most patients do well with regard to infections. Many develop CD, at a rate much higher than the general population. A few normalize their IgA levels. A few progress to CVID. Thus, careful follow-up is suggested to diagnose and treat potential complications earlier for avoiding potential morbidities.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11564/715220
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