Background: Accountable care has changed organizational models adopted by health care organizations profoundly and, consequently, the skill set required for doctor-managers who have become middle managers and must deal with the operational management of their units. Doctor-managers must carry out clinical tasks as well as tasks related to budgeting, goal setting, and performance evaluation. The performance evaluation bias, defined as the misalignment between a ward unit’s objective performance (as assessed by technical bodies or agencies) and self-assessed performance by the head of the unit, may have serious consequences for individuals and organizations. Purpose: The aim of this study was to identify determinants of performance appraisal bias based on the mismatch between self-reported and official performance data. Specifically, we analyzed the role played by managerial behavior, training, engagement, and perceived organizational support at the individual level, as well as the particular unit’s task diversity, complexity, and predictability. Methodology: We collected primary and secondary data referable to a population of ward unit heads in the Italian National Health Service. A linear regression model predicting performance appraisal bias was employed. Findings: High levels of engagement and perceived organizational support were associated with reduced performance appraisal bias, whereas high levels of predictability and task diversity were associated with increased degree of error. Doctor-managers attending training programs in health care management and ward unit task complexity did not affect bias significantly.

Individual and job-related determinants of bias in performance appraisal: The case of middle management in health care organizations

Federica Morandi;Daria Angelozzi;Fausto Di Vincenzo
2020

Abstract

Background: Accountable care has changed organizational models adopted by health care organizations profoundly and, consequently, the skill set required for doctor-managers who have become middle managers and must deal with the operational management of their units. Doctor-managers must carry out clinical tasks as well as tasks related to budgeting, goal setting, and performance evaluation. The performance evaluation bias, defined as the misalignment between a ward unit’s objective performance (as assessed by technical bodies or agencies) and self-assessed performance by the head of the unit, may have serious consequences for individuals and organizations. Purpose: The aim of this study was to identify determinants of performance appraisal bias based on the mismatch between self-reported and official performance data. Specifically, we analyzed the role played by managerial behavior, training, engagement, and perceived organizational support at the individual level, as well as the particular unit’s task diversity, complexity, and predictability. Methodology: We collected primary and secondary data referable to a population of ward unit heads in the Italian National Health Service. A linear regression model predicting performance appraisal bias was employed. Findings: High levels of engagement and perceived organizational support were associated with reduced performance appraisal bias, whereas high levels of predictability and task diversity were associated with increased degree of error. Doctor-managers attending training programs in health care management and ward unit task complexity did not affect bias significantly.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11564/720777
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