Objective: To evaluate the association between obesity and risk of multiple lymph node metastases in prostate cancer (PCa) patients with clinically localized EAU intermediate and high-risk classes staged by extended pelvic lymph-node dissection (ePLND) during robot assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP). Materials and methods: 373 consecutive PCa intermediate or high-risk patients were treated by RARP and ePLND. According to pathology results, extension of LNI was classified as absent (pN0 status) or present (pN1 status); pN1 was further categorized as one or more than one (multiple LNI) lymph node metastases. A logistic regression model (univariate and multivariate analysis) was used to evaluate the association between significant categorized clinical factors and the risk of multiple lymph nodes metastases. Results: Overall, after surgery lymph node metastases were detected in 51 patients (13.7%) of whom 22 (5.9%) with more than one metastatic lymph node and 29 (7.8%) with only one positive node. Comparing patients with one positive node to those without, EAU high-risk class only predicted risk of single LNI (OR = 2.872; p = 0.008). The risk of multiple lymph node metastases, when compared to cases without LNI, was independently predicted by BMI ≥ 30 (OR = 6.950; p = 0.002) together with BPC ≥ 50% (OR = 3.910; p = 0.004) and EAU high-risk class (OR = 6.187; p < 0.0001). Among metastatic patients, BMI ≥ 30 was the only factor associated with the risk of multiple LNI (OR = 5.250; p = 0.041). Conclusions: In patients with clinically localized EAU intermediate and high-risk classes PCa who underwent RARP and ePLND, obesity was a risk factor of multiple LNI.

Obesity strongly predicts clinically undetected multiple lymph node metastases in intermediate- and high-risk prostate cancer patients who underwent robot assisted radical prostatectomy and extended lymph node dissection.

Vittore Verratti;
2020

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate the association between obesity and risk of multiple lymph node metastases in prostate cancer (PCa) patients with clinically localized EAU intermediate and high-risk classes staged by extended pelvic lymph-node dissection (ePLND) during robot assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP). Materials and methods: 373 consecutive PCa intermediate or high-risk patients were treated by RARP and ePLND. According to pathology results, extension of LNI was classified as absent (pN0 status) or present (pN1 status); pN1 was further categorized as one or more than one (multiple LNI) lymph node metastases. A logistic regression model (univariate and multivariate analysis) was used to evaluate the association between significant categorized clinical factors and the risk of multiple lymph nodes metastases. Results: Overall, after surgery lymph node metastases were detected in 51 patients (13.7%) of whom 22 (5.9%) with more than one metastatic lymph node and 29 (7.8%) with only one positive node. Comparing patients with one positive node to those without, EAU high-risk class only predicted risk of single LNI (OR = 2.872; p = 0.008). The risk of multiple lymph node metastases, when compared to cases without LNI, was independently predicted by BMI ≥ 30 (OR = 6.950; p = 0.002) together with BPC ≥ 50% (OR = 3.910; p = 0.004) and EAU high-risk class (OR = 6.187; p < 0.0001). Among metastatic patients, BMI ≥ 30 was the only factor associated with the risk of multiple LNI (OR = 5.250; p = 0.041). Conclusions: In patients with clinically localized EAU intermediate and high-risk classes PCa who underwent RARP and ePLND, obesity was a risk factor of multiple LNI.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11564/727573
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