Sex estimation is the keystone for positive identification when an unidentified human body is recovered in forensic contexts. However, in complex death scenes such as mass disasters, the remains are often fleshed, mutilated, burned, and/or commingled. In situations such as these where it is not possible to analyze pelvis and/or cranium data, traditional metric and qualitative morphological methods on postcranial bones can yield unsatisfactory results. In such cases, geometric morphometric techniques offer an alternative to the analysis of both shape and size components of morphological variation that can be of great utility for sex estimation in forensic investigations. The study population consisted of 72 well-preserved adult humeri (40 males and 32 females; mean age of 62 years) that were photographed in standardized positions with landmarks located in four twodimensional views of the humerus (anterior surface of the proximal epiphysis, and anterior, posterior and inferior surface of distal epiphysis). Principal components analysis, canonical variates analysis and discriminant analysis were applied. The data indicated that males and females were classified with low levels of accuracy (54.95–77.92% for males; 56.87–71.78% for females) based on shape variables. However, when the shape variable was combined with the centroid size, the levels of accuracy increased (81.86–94.92% for males; 84.08–94.88% for females). To obtain larger differences between males and females, it is necessary the combination of centroid size with shape variables; the shape of the humerus is insufficient to discriminate sex with accuracy.

Sex estimation of the humerus: a geometric morphometric analysis in an adult sample

Viciano, J.
Ultimo
2020

Abstract

Sex estimation is the keystone for positive identification when an unidentified human body is recovered in forensic contexts. However, in complex death scenes such as mass disasters, the remains are often fleshed, mutilated, burned, and/or commingled. In situations such as these where it is not possible to analyze pelvis and/or cranium data, traditional metric and qualitative morphological methods on postcranial bones can yield unsatisfactory results. In such cases, geometric morphometric techniques offer an alternative to the analysis of both shape and size components of morphological variation that can be of great utility for sex estimation in forensic investigations. The study population consisted of 72 well-preserved adult humeri (40 males and 32 females; mean age of 62 years) that were photographed in standardized positions with landmarks located in four twodimensional views of the humerus (anterior surface of the proximal epiphysis, and anterior, posterior and inferior surface of distal epiphysis). Principal components analysis, canonical variates analysis and discriminant analysis were applied. The data indicated that males and females were classified with low levels of accuracy (54.95–77.92% for males; 56.87–71.78% for females) based on shape variables. However, when the shape variable was combined with the centroid size, the levels of accuracy increased (81.86–94.92% for males; 84.08–94.88% for females). To obtain larger differences between males and females, it is necessary the combination of centroid size with shape variables; the shape of the humerus is insufficient to discriminate sex with accuracy.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11564/728303
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