Objective: The clinical management of high symptom severity is a challenging task with patients with functional somatic disorders. We investigated the extent to which DCPR-revised (DCPR-R) syndromes and the DSM-5 category of Somatic Symptom Disorder (SSD) were able to predict symptom severity in 203 consecutive tertiary care patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Method: Semistructured interview were used for assessing DCPR-R and validated scales for SSD (combining PHQ-12 and WI-7), severity of symptoms (IBS-SSS), psychological distress (HADS), and psychosocial functioning (SF-12). Results: Compared to moderate severity (IBS-SSS = 175–300), patients in the high range of severity (IBS-SSS > 300) had significantly more DCPR-R syndromes (particularly alexithymia and persistent somatization), higher psychological distress, and poorer psychosocial functioning, but showed no difference for SSD. DCPR-R, particularly alexithymia and persistent somatization, significantly and independently predicted IBS severity by explaining 18.5% of the IBS-SSS variance with large effect size (d = 1.18), after controlling for covariables. Conversely, SSD was not able to significantly predict IBS severity. Conclusions: This study highlights the need of an integrative approach in the medical setting. Psychosomatic factors play a relevant role in the individual perception of symptom severity and should be carefully evaluated for clinical management of functional syndromes.

Distinct associations of DSM-5 Somatic Symptom Disorder, the Diagnostic Criteria for Psychosomatic Research-Revised (DCPR-R) and symptom severity in patients with irritable bowel syndrome

Porcelli P.;
2020

Abstract

Objective: The clinical management of high symptom severity is a challenging task with patients with functional somatic disorders. We investigated the extent to which DCPR-revised (DCPR-R) syndromes and the DSM-5 category of Somatic Symptom Disorder (SSD) were able to predict symptom severity in 203 consecutive tertiary care patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Method: Semistructured interview were used for assessing DCPR-R and validated scales for SSD (combining PHQ-12 and WI-7), severity of symptoms (IBS-SSS), psychological distress (HADS), and psychosocial functioning (SF-12). Results: Compared to moderate severity (IBS-SSS = 175–300), patients in the high range of severity (IBS-SSS > 300) had significantly more DCPR-R syndromes (particularly alexithymia and persistent somatization), higher psychological distress, and poorer psychosocial functioning, but showed no difference for SSD. DCPR-R, particularly alexithymia and persistent somatization, significantly and independently predicted IBS severity by explaining 18.5% of the IBS-SSS variance with large effect size (d = 1.18), after controlling for covariables. Conversely, SSD was not able to significantly predict IBS severity. Conclusions: This study highlights the need of an integrative approach in the medical setting. Psychosomatic factors play a relevant role in the individual perception of symptom severity and should be carefully evaluated for clinical management of functional syndromes.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11564/730969
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