Doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX) is currently used to treat orthotropic and metastatic breast cancer. Because of its side effects, the use of DOX in cancer patients is sometimes limited; for this reason, several scientists tried designing drug delivery systems which can improve drug therapeutic efficacy and decrease its side effects. In this study, we designed, prepared, and physiochemically characterized nonionic surfactant vesicles (NSVs) which are obtained by self-assembling different combinations of hydrophilic (Tween 20) and hydrophobic (Span 20) surfactants, with cholesterol. DOX was loaded in NSVs using a passive and pH gradient remote loading procedure, which increased drug loading from ∼1 to ∼45%. NSVs were analyzed in terms of size, shape, size distribution, zeta potential, long-term stability, entrapment efficiency, and release kinetics, and nanocarriers having the best physiochemical parameters were selected for further in vitro tests. NSVs with and without DOX were stable and showed a sustained drug release up to 72 h. In vitro studies, with MCF-7 and MDA MB 468 cells, demonstrated that NSVs, containing Span 20, were better internalized in MCF-7 and MDA MB 468 cells than NSVs with Tween 20. NSVs increased the anticancer effect of DOX in MCF-7 and MDA MB 468 cells, and this effect is time and dose dependent. In vitro studies using metastatic and nonmetastatic breast cancer cells also demonstrated that NSVs, containing Span 20, had higher cytotoxicity than NSVs with Tween 20. The resulting data suggested that DOX-loaded NSVs could be a promising nanocarrier for the potential treatment of metastatic breast cancer.

Doxorubicin Hydrochloride-Loaded Nonionic Surfactant Vesicles to Treat Metastatic and Non-Metastatic Breast Cancer

Christian Celia
Co-primo
;
Nicola d'Avanzo;Luisa Di Marzio
;
2021-01-01

Abstract

Doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX) is currently used to treat orthotropic and metastatic breast cancer. Because of its side effects, the use of DOX in cancer patients is sometimes limited; for this reason, several scientists tried designing drug delivery systems which can improve drug therapeutic efficacy and decrease its side effects. In this study, we designed, prepared, and physiochemically characterized nonionic surfactant vesicles (NSVs) which are obtained by self-assembling different combinations of hydrophilic (Tween 20) and hydrophobic (Span 20) surfactants, with cholesterol. DOX was loaded in NSVs using a passive and pH gradient remote loading procedure, which increased drug loading from ∼1 to ∼45%. NSVs were analyzed in terms of size, shape, size distribution, zeta potential, long-term stability, entrapment efficiency, and release kinetics, and nanocarriers having the best physiochemical parameters were selected for further in vitro tests. NSVs with and without DOX were stable and showed a sustained drug release up to 72 h. In vitro studies, with MCF-7 and MDA MB 468 cells, demonstrated that NSVs, containing Span 20, were better internalized in MCF-7 and MDA MB 468 cells than NSVs with Tween 20. NSVs increased the anticancer effect of DOX in MCF-7 and MDA MB 468 cells, and this effect is time and dose dependent. In vitro studies using metastatic and nonmetastatic breast cancer cells also demonstrated that NSVs, containing Span 20, had higher cytotoxicity than NSVs with Tween 20. The resulting data suggested that DOX-loaded NSVs could be a promising nanocarrier for the potential treatment of metastatic breast cancer.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11564/742567
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