Background and aims: Gambling Disorder (GD) is considered a heterogeneous, multidimensional pathology with high personal and social consequences. The transition time (TT) between problematic gaming and pathological gambling, which varies significantly across patients, may predict the disorder's severity. As only limited studies have investigated the factors implicated in the TT, the current study set out to identify its predictors and their relationships with GD severity. Methods: Correlation were performed in 725 male GD patients to identify factors associated to TT and GD severity, including: age of onset of gambling behaviors, alcohol/drug use, personality traits and gambling preferences (i.e., strategic, non-strategic, and mixed). Then a regression analysis was performed to identify predictors of TT to GD. Results: Longer TT correlated with higher GD severity, early age of onset of problematic gambling, substance use and a non-strategic gambling preference. Personality traits including low self-directedness, high novelty seeking, and low cooperativeness were also related with longer TT. The strongest associations with GD severity were substance use, and some of the personality traits (i.e., low self-directedness and cooperativeness, high harm avoidance and self-transcendence). Factors significantly predicting longer transition to GD were older ages, low self-directedness, and non-strategic gambling. Conclusions: A clinical profile characterized by a longer TT and more severe GD symptoms pertains to older patients with low self-directedness, and preference for non-strategic gambling. Other relevant factors associated with this profile of patients included early age of onset problematic gambling, substance consumption, high novelty seeking and low cooperativeness.

The transition time to gambling disorder: The roles that age, gambling preference and personality traits play

Pettorruso M.
Primo
;
Martinotti G.;d'Andrea G.;di Giannantonio M.;
2021-01-01

Abstract

Background and aims: Gambling Disorder (GD) is considered a heterogeneous, multidimensional pathology with high personal and social consequences. The transition time (TT) between problematic gaming and pathological gambling, which varies significantly across patients, may predict the disorder's severity. As only limited studies have investigated the factors implicated in the TT, the current study set out to identify its predictors and their relationships with GD severity. Methods: Correlation were performed in 725 male GD patients to identify factors associated to TT and GD severity, including: age of onset of gambling behaviors, alcohol/drug use, personality traits and gambling preferences (i.e., strategic, non-strategic, and mixed). Then a regression analysis was performed to identify predictors of TT to GD. Results: Longer TT correlated with higher GD severity, early age of onset of problematic gambling, substance use and a non-strategic gambling preference. Personality traits including low self-directedness, high novelty seeking, and low cooperativeness were also related with longer TT. The strongest associations with GD severity were substance use, and some of the personality traits (i.e., low self-directedness and cooperativeness, high harm avoidance and self-transcendence). Factors significantly predicting longer transition to GD were older ages, low self-directedness, and non-strategic gambling. Conclusions: A clinical profile characterized by a longer TT and more severe GD symptoms pertains to older patients with low self-directedness, and preference for non-strategic gambling. Other relevant factors associated with this profile of patients included early age of onset problematic gambling, substance consumption, high novelty seeking and low cooperativeness.
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
1-s2.0-S0306460320309424-main (1).pdf

Solo gestori archivio

Descrizione: Article
Tipologia: PDF editoriale
Dimensione 598.68 kB
Formato Adobe PDF
598.68 kB Adobe PDF   Visualizza/Apri   Richiedi una copia

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11564/744488
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 2
  • Scopus 11
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 11
social impact