Immunosenescence, vascular aging, and brain aging, all characterized by elevated levels of inflammatory markers, are thought to share a common pathogenetic pathway: inflamm-aging. Retrospective cross-sectional analysis was conducted using data from the Mugello study (Tuscany, Italy), a representative Italian cohort of free-living nonagenarians. to assess the association between specific peripheral inflammation markers derived from white blood cell counts, and the diagnosis of dementia. All the variables of interest were reported for 411 subjects (110 males and 301 females) out of 475 enrolled in the study. Anamnestic dementia diagnosis was obtained from clinical certificate and confirmed by a General Practitioner, whereas leukocyte ratios were directly calculated from white blood cell counts. Body mass index and comorbidities were considered potential confounders. Diagnosis of any type dementia was certified in 73 cases (17.8%). Subjects affected by dementia were older, more frequently reported a previous stroke, had lower body mass index, and lower Mini-Mental-State-Examination score. Moreover, they had a higher lymphocyte count and lymphocyte-to-monocyte ratio compared to the non-demented nonagenarians. We found that higher levels of lymphocyte counts are cross-sectionally associated with a clinical diagnosis of dementia. Furthermore, lymphocyte-to-monocyte ratio is directly associated with any type of dementia, independently of age, sex, lymphocyte count, and comorbidities. Lymphocyte-to-monocyte ratio may be considered a marker of immunological changes in the brain of dementia patients; moreover, it is low-cost, and easily available, thus enabling comparisons among different studies and populations, although the timeline and the extent of lymphocyte-to-monocyte ratio role in dementia development must be further investigated.

Leukocyte-derived ratios are associated with late-life any type dementia: a cross-sectional analysis of the Mugello study

Paganelli R.;Abate M.;Di Iorio A.
;
2021-01-01

Abstract

Immunosenescence, vascular aging, and brain aging, all characterized by elevated levels of inflammatory markers, are thought to share a common pathogenetic pathway: inflamm-aging. Retrospective cross-sectional analysis was conducted using data from the Mugello study (Tuscany, Italy), a representative Italian cohort of free-living nonagenarians. to assess the association between specific peripheral inflammation markers derived from white blood cell counts, and the diagnosis of dementia. All the variables of interest were reported for 411 subjects (110 males and 301 females) out of 475 enrolled in the study. Anamnestic dementia diagnosis was obtained from clinical certificate and confirmed by a General Practitioner, whereas leukocyte ratios were directly calculated from white blood cell counts. Body mass index and comorbidities were considered potential confounders. Diagnosis of any type dementia was certified in 73 cases (17.8%). Subjects affected by dementia were older, more frequently reported a previous stroke, had lower body mass index, and lower Mini-Mental-State-Examination score. Moreover, they had a higher lymphocyte count and lymphocyte-to-monocyte ratio compared to the non-demented nonagenarians. We found that higher levels of lymphocyte counts are cross-sectionally associated with a clinical diagnosis of dementia. Furthermore, lymphocyte-to-monocyte ratio is directly associated with any type of dementia, independently of age, sex, lymphocyte count, and comorbidities. Lymphocyte-to-monocyte ratio may be considered a marker of immunological changes in the brain of dementia patients; moreover, it is low-cost, and easily available, thus enabling comparisons among different studies and populations, although the timeline and the extent of lymphocyte-to-monocyte ratio role in dementia development must be further investigated.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11564/762609
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