The present work evaluates the aromatic waters of rosemary (Salvia rosmarinus Spenn. syn. Rosmarinus officinalis L.), sage (Salvia officinalis L.), and cypress (Cupressus sempervirens L.) obtained as innovative commercial products of a hydrodistillation process. All extracts were exhaustively analysed by GC‐MS,1H‐NMR, and LC‐MS in order to evaluate potential metabolite fingerprint differences. GC‐MS appears to be the most exhaustive technique for the qualitative identification of the single constituents, although in this case, the use of1H‐NMR and LC‐MS techniques allowed some useful considerations in semi‐quantitative terms. Antimycotic effects were studied against Tricophyton, Candida, and Arthroderma species, resulting in weak activity. The toxicological impact was partly evaluated in vitro by means of allelopathy and brine shrimp lethality. Cytotoxicity was investigated in human colon cancer cells (HCT116) and in hypothalamic cells (Hypo‐E22) challenged with hydrogen peroxide. Sage and rosemary hydrosols were the most effective antimycotics, whereas all hydrosols displayed antiradical effects. Cytotoxic effects against HCT116 cells (at 500 μL/mL) were related in silico to the endovanilloid TRPM8 and TRPV1 receptors. At lower concentrations (5–50 μL/mL), the hydrosols protected hypothalamic neurons Hypo‐E22 cells from hydrogen peroxide‐induced toxicity. The overall experience indicates that hydrolates are an important source of relevant phytochemicals with significant pharmacological potential.

Hydrosols from Rosmarinus officinalis, Salvia officinalis, and Cupressus sempervirens: Phytochemical Analysis and Bioactivity Evaluation

Politi M.;Ferrante C.;Menghini L.;Flores G. A.;
2022-01-01

Abstract

The present work evaluates the aromatic waters of rosemary (Salvia rosmarinus Spenn. syn. Rosmarinus officinalis L.), sage (Salvia officinalis L.), and cypress (Cupressus sempervirens L.) obtained as innovative commercial products of a hydrodistillation process. All extracts were exhaustively analysed by GC‐MS,1H‐NMR, and LC‐MS in order to evaluate potential metabolite fingerprint differences. GC‐MS appears to be the most exhaustive technique for the qualitative identification of the single constituents, although in this case, the use of1H‐NMR and LC‐MS techniques allowed some useful considerations in semi‐quantitative terms. Antimycotic effects were studied against Tricophyton, Candida, and Arthroderma species, resulting in weak activity. The toxicological impact was partly evaluated in vitro by means of allelopathy and brine shrimp lethality. Cytotoxicity was investigated in human colon cancer cells (HCT116) and in hypothalamic cells (Hypo‐E22) challenged with hydrogen peroxide. Sage and rosemary hydrosols were the most effective antimycotics, whereas all hydrosols displayed antiradical effects. Cytotoxic effects against HCT116 cells (at 500 μL/mL) were related in silico to the endovanilloid TRPM8 and TRPV1 receptors. At lower concentrations (5–50 μL/mL), the hydrosols protected hypothalamic neurons Hypo‐E22 cells from hydrogen peroxide‐induced toxicity. The overall experience indicates that hydrolates are an important source of relevant phytochemicals with significant pharmacological potential.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11564/766187
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