This paper proposes a computational model based on a finite-element formulation for describing the mechanical behavior of femurs affected by metastatic lesions. A novel geometric/constitutive description is introduced by modelling healthy bone and metastases via a linearly poroelastic constitutive approach. A Gaussian-shaped graded transition of material properties between healthy and metastatic tissues is prescribed, in order to account for the bone-metastasis interaction. Loading-induced failure processes are simulated by implementing a progressive damage procedure, formulated via a quasi-static displacement-driven incremental approach, and considering both a stress- and a strain-based failure criterion. By addressing a real clinical case, left and right patient-specific femur models are geometrically reconstructed via an ad-hoc imaging procedure and embedding multiple distributions of metastatic lesions along femurs. Significant differences in fracture loads, fracture mechanisms, and damage patterns, are highlighted by comparing the proposed constitutive description with a purely elastic formulation, where the metastasis is treated as a pseudo-healthy tissue or as a void region. Proposed constitutive description allows to capture stress/strain localization mechanisms within the metastatic tissue, revealing the model capability in describing possible strain-induced mechano-biological stimuli driving onset and evolution of the lesion. The proposed approach opens towards the definition of effective computational strategies for supporting clinical decision and treatments regarding metastatic femurs, contributing also to overcome some limitations of actual standards and procedures.

Mechanical behavior of metastatic femurs through patient-specific computational models accounting for bone-metastasis interaction

Falcinelli C.;
2019

Abstract

This paper proposes a computational model based on a finite-element formulation for describing the mechanical behavior of femurs affected by metastatic lesions. A novel geometric/constitutive description is introduced by modelling healthy bone and metastases via a linearly poroelastic constitutive approach. A Gaussian-shaped graded transition of material properties between healthy and metastatic tissues is prescribed, in order to account for the bone-metastasis interaction. Loading-induced failure processes are simulated by implementing a progressive damage procedure, formulated via a quasi-static displacement-driven incremental approach, and considering both a stress- and a strain-based failure criterion. By addressing a real clinical case, left and right patient-specific femur models are geometrically reconstructed via an ad-hoc imaging procedure and embedding multiple distributions of metastatic lesions along femurs. Significant differences in fracture loads, fracture mechanisms, and damage patterns, are highlighted by comparing the proposed constitutive description with a purely elastic formulation, where the metastasis is treated as a pseudo-healthy tissue or as a void region. Proposed constitutive description allows to capture stress/strain localization mechanisms within the metastatic tissue, revealing the model capability in describing possible strain-induced mechano-biological stimuli driving onset and evolution of the lesion. The proposed approach opens towards the definition of effective computational strategies for supporting clinical decision and treatments regarding metastatic femurs, contributing also to overcome some limitations of actual standards and procedures.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11564/769924
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