Fracture is considered a critical clinical endpoint in skeletal pathologies including osteoporosis and bone metastases. However, current clinical guidelines are limited with respect to identifying cases at high risk of fracture, as they do not account for many mechanical determinants that contribute to bone fracture. Improving fracture risk assessment is an important area of research with clear clinical relevance. Patient-specific numerical musculoskeletal models generated from diagnostic images are widely used in biomechanics research and may provide the foundation for clinical tools used to quantify fracture risk. However, prior to clinical translation, in vitro validation of predictions generated from such numerical models is necessary. Despite adopting radically different models, in vitro validation of image-based finite element (FE) models of the proximal femur (predicting strains and failure loads) have shown very similar, encouraging levels of accuracy. The accuracy of such in vitro models has motivated their application to clinical studies of osteoporotic and metastatic fractures. Such models have demonstrated promising but heterogeneous results, which may be explained by the lack of a uniform strategy with respect to FE modeling of the human femur. This review aims to critically discuss the state of the art of image-based femoral FE modeling strategies, highlighting principal features and differences among current approaches. Quantitative results are also reported with respect to the level of accuracy achieved from in vitro evaluations and clinical applications and are used to motivate the adoption of a standardized approach/workflow for image-based FE modeling of the femur.

Image-based finite-element modeling of the human femur

Falcinelli C.
;
2020

Abstract

Fracture is considered a critical clinical endpoint in skeletal pathologies including osteoporosis and bone metastases. However, current clinical guidelines are limited with respect to identifying cases at high risk of fracture, as they do not account for many mechanical determinants that contribute to bone fracture. Improving fracture risk assessment is an important area of research with clear clinical relevance. Patient-specific numerical musculoskeletal models generated from diagnostic images are widely used in biomechanics research and may provide the foundation for clinical tools used to quantify fracture risk. However, prior to clinical translation, in vitro validation of predictions generated from such numerical models is necessary. Despite adopting radically different models, in vitro validation of image-based finite element (FE) models of the proximal femur (predicting strains and failure loads) have shown very similar, encouraging levels of accuracy. The accuracy of such in vitro models has motivated their application to clinical studies of osteoporotic and metastatic fractures. Such models have demonstrated promising but heterogeneous results, which may be explained by the lack of a uniform strategy with respect to FE modeling of the human femur. This review aims to critically discuss the state of the art of image-based femoral FE modeling strategies, highlighting principal features and differences among current approaches. Quantitative results are also reported with respect to the level of accuracy achieved from in vitro evaluations and clinical applications and are used to motivate the adoption of a standardized approach/workflow for image-based FE modeling of the femur.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11564/769930
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