Heparins and vitamin K antagonists are the mainstay of treatment of splanchnic vein thrombosis (SVT). Rivaroxaban is a potential alternative, but data to support its use are limited. We aimed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of rivaroxaban for the treatment of acute SVT. In an international, single-arm clinical trial, adult patients with a first episode of noncirrhotic, symptomatic, objectively diagnosed SVT received rivaroxaban 15 mg twice daily for 3 weeks, followed by 20 mg daily for an intended duration of 3 months. Patients with Budd-Chiari syndrome and those receiving full-dose anticoagulation for >7 days prior to enrollment were excluded. Primary outcome was major bleeding; secondary outcomes included death, recurrent SVT, and complete vein recanalization within 3 months. Patients were followed for a total of 6 months. A total of 103 patients were enrolled; 100 were eligible for the analysis. Mean age was 54.4 years; 64% were men. SVT risk factors included abdominal inflammation/infection (28%), solid cancer (9%), myeloproliferative neoplasms (9%), and hormonal therapy (9%); 43% of cases were unprovoked. JAK2 V617F mutation was detected in 26% of 50 tested patients. At 3 months, 2 patients (2.1%; 95% confidence interval, 0.6-7.2) had major bleeding events (both gastrointestinal). One (1.0%) patient died due to a non-SVT-related cause, 2 had recurrent SVT (2.1%). Complete recanalization was documented in 47.3% of patients. One additional major bleeding event and 1 recurrent SVT occurred at 6 months. Rivaroxaban appears as a potential alternative to standard anticoagulation for the treatment of SVT in non-cirrhotic patients.

Rivaroxaban for the treatment of noncirrhotic splanchnic vein thrombosis: an interventional prospective cohort study

Di Nisio, M;
2022

Abstract

Heparins and vitamin K antagonists are the mainstay of treatment of splanchnic vein thrombosis (SVT). Rivaroxaban is a potential alternative, but data to support its use are limited. We aimed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of rivaroxaban for the treatment of acute SVT. In an international, single-arm clinical trial, adult patients with a first episode of noncirrhotic, symptomatic, objectively diagnosed SVT received rivaroxaban 15 mg twice daily for 3 weeks, followed by 20 mg daily for an intended duration of 3 months. Patients with Budd-Chiari syndrome and those receiving full-dose anticoagulation for >7 days prior to enrollment were excluded. Primary outcome was major bleeding; secondary outcomes included death, recurrent SVT, and complete vein recanalization within 3 months. Patients were followed for a total of 6 months. A total of 103 patients were enrolled; 100 were eligible for the analysis. Mean age was 54.4 years; 64% were men. SVT risk factors included abdominal inflammation/infection (28%), solid cancer (9%), myeloproliferative neoplasms (9%), and hormonal therapy (9%); 43% of cases were unprovoked. JAK2 V617F mutation was detected in 26% of 50 tested patients. At 3 months, 2 patients (2.1%; 95% confidence interval, 0.6-7.2) had major bleeding events (both gastrointestinal). One (1.0%) patient died due to a non-SVT-related cause, 2 had recurrent SVT (2.1%). Complete recanalization was documented in 47.3% of patients. One additional major bleeding event and 1 recurrent SVT occurred at 6 months. Rivaroxaban appears as a potential alternative to standard anticoagulation for the treatment of SVT in non-cirrhotic patients.
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
2022-Ageno-BloodAdv2022.pdf

Solo gestori archivio

Tipologia: Documento in Post-print
Dimensione 1.08 MB
Formato Adobe PDF
1.08 MB Adobe PDF   Visualizza/Apri   Richiedi una copia

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11564/789780
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 0
  • Scopus 0
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 0
social impact