Memory for time is influenced by reconstructive processes, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. The present study investigated whether the effect of schematic prior knowledge on temporal memory for movie scenes, produced by the incomplete presentation (cut) of the movie at encoding, is modulated by cut position, retention interval, and task repetition. In a timeline positioning task, participants were asked to indicate when short video clips extracted from a previously encoded movie occurred on a horizontal timeline that represented the video duration. In line with previous findings, removing the final part of the movie resulted in a systematic underestimation of clips' position as a function of their proximity to the missing part. Further experiments demonstrate that the direction of this automatic effect depends on which part of the movie is deleted from the encoding session, consistent with the inferential structure of the schema, and does not depend on consolidation nor reconsolidation processes, at least within the present experimental conditions. We propose that the observed bias depends on the automatic influence of reconstructive processes on judgments about the time of occurrence, based on prior schematic knowledge.

Effects of a narrative template on memory for the time of movie scenes: automatic reshaping is independent of consolidation

Frisoni, Matteo;Di Ghionno, Monica;Guidotti, Roberto;Tosoni, Annalisa;Sestieri, Carlo
2022

Abstract

Memory for time is influenced by reconstructive processes, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. The present study investigated whether the effect of schematic prior knowledge on temporal memory for movie scenes, produced by the incomplete presentation (cut) of the movie at encoding, is modulated by cut position, retention interval, and task repetition. In a timeline positioning task, participants were asked to indicate when short video clips extracted from a previously encoded movie occurred on a horizontal timeline that represented the video duration. In line with previous findings, removing the final part of the movie resulted in a systematic underestimation of clips' position as a function of their proximity to the missing part. Further experiments demonstrate that the direction of this automatic effect depends on which part of the movie is deleted from the encoding session, consistent with the inferential structure of the schema, and does not depend on consolidation nor reconsolidation processes, at least within the present experimental conditions. We propose that the observed bias depends on the automatic influence of reconstructive processes on judgments about the time of occurrence, based on prior schematic knowledge.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11564/792145
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