Background: Neurodegeneration in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) in parkinsonian syndromes may affect the nigral territories differently. Objective: The objective of this study was to investigate the regional selectivity of neurodegenerative changes in the SNc in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and atypical parkinsonism using neuromelanin-sensitive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods: A total of 22 healthy controls (HC), 38 patients with PD, 22 patients with progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), 20 patients with multiple system atrophy (MSA, 13 with the parkinsonian variant, 7 with the cerebellar variant), 7 patients with dementia with Lewy body (DLB), and 4 patients with corticobasal syndrome were analyzed. volume and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) values of the SNc were derived from neuromelanin-sensitive MRI in the whole SNc. Analysis of signal changes was performed in the sensorimotor, associative, and limbic territories of the SNc. Results: SNc volume and corrected volume were significantly reduced in PD, PSP, and MSA versus HC. Patients with PSP had lower volume, corrected volume, SNR, and contrast-to-noise ratio than HC and patients with PD and MSA. Patients with PSP had greater SNR reduction in the associative region than HC and patients with PD and MSA. Patients with PD had reduced SNR in the sensorimotor territory, unlike patients with PSP. Patients with MSA did not differ from patients with PD. Conclusions: This study provides the first MRI comparison of the topography of neuromelanin changes in parkinsonism. The spatial pattern of changes differed between PSP and synucleinopathies. These nigral topographical differences are consistent with the topography of the extranigral involvement in parkinsonian syndromes. © 2022 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

Regional Selectivity of Neuromelanin Changes in the Substantia Nigra in Atypical Parkinsonism

Biondetti, Emma;
2022-01-01

Abstract

Background: Neurodegeneration in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) in parkinsonian syndromes may affect the nigral territories differently. Objective: The objective of this study was to investigate the regional selectivity of neurodegenerative changes in the SNc in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and atypical parkinsonism using neuromelanin-sensitive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods: A total of 22 healthy controls (HC), 38 patients with PD, 22 patients with progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), 20 patients with multiple system atrophy (MSA, 13 with the parkinsonian variant, 7 with the cerebellar variant), 7 patients with dementia with Lewy body (DLB), and 4 patients with corticobasal syndrome were analyzed. volume and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) values of the SNc were derived from neuromelanin-sensitive MRI in the whole SNc. Analysis of signal changes was performed in the sensorimotor, associative, and limbic territories of the SNc. Results: SNc volume and corrected volume were significantly reduced in PD, PSP, and MSA versus HC. Patients with PSP had lower volume, corrected volume, SNR, and contrast-to-noise ratio than HC and patients with PD and MSA. Patients with PSP had greater SNR reduction in the associative region than HC and patients with PD and MSA. Patients with PD had reduced SNR in the sensorimotor territory, unlike patients with PSP. Patients with MSA did not differ from patients with PD. Conclusions: This study provides the first MRI comparison of the topography of neuromelanin changes in parkinsonism. The spatial pattern of changes differed between PSP and synucleinopathies. These nigral topographical differences are consistent with the topography of the extranigral involvement in parkinsonian syndromes. © 2022 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
Movement Disorders - 2022 - Chougar - Regional Selectivity of Neuromelanin Changes in the Substantia Nigra in Atypical.pdf

accesso aperto

Tipologia: PDF editoriale
Dimensione 857.31 kB
Formato Adobe PDF
857.31 kB Adobe PDF Visualizza/Apri

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11564/798312
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 2
  • Scopus 7
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 7
social impact