: Background/Purpose: To investigate the association between the degree of spatial neglect and the changes of brain system segregation (SyS; i.e., the ratio of the extent to which brain networks interact internally and with each other) after stroke. Methods: A cohort of 20 patients with right hemisphere lesion was submitted to neuropsychological assessment as well as to resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging session at acute stage after stroke. The severity of spatial neglect was quantified using the Center of Cancellation (CoC) scores of the Bells cancellation test. For each patient, resting-state functional connectivity (FC) matrices were assessed by implementing a brain parcellation of nine networks that included the visual network, dorsal attention network (DAN), ventral attention network (VAN), sensorimotor network (SMN), auditory network, cingulo-opercular network, language network, frontoparietal network, and default mode network (DMN). For each patient and each network, we then computed the SyS derived by subtracting the between-network FC from the within-network FC (normalized by the within-network FC). Finally, for each network, the CoC scores were correlated with the SyS. Results: The correlational analyses indicated a negative association between CoC and SyS in the DAN, VAN, SMN, and DMN (q < 0.05 false discovery rate [FDR]-corrected). Patients with more severe spatial neglect exhibited lower SyS and vice versa. Conclusion: The loss of segregation in multiple and specific networks provides a functional framework for the deficits in spatial and nonspatial attention and motor/exploratory ability observed in neglect patients. Impact statement In a graph-theoretic framework, we identify a loss of system segregation associative and sensorimotor networks in neglect patients who had suffered from right hemisphere stroke. From a theoretical standpoint, our findings corroborate the working hypothesis that the efficient segregation among brain systems is relevant for executing higher functions such as spatial attention. Clinically, the set of networks that exhibit loss of segregation offers a therapeutic opportunity and can be targets of neuromodulation protocols for neglect rehabilitation.

Reduced Segregation of Brain Networks in Spatial Neglect After Stroke

Spadone, Sara
Primo
;
Chiacchiaretta, Piero;Capotosto, Paolo;Delli Pizzi, Stefano;Sensi, Stefano L;Committeri, Giorgia;Baldassarre, Antonello
Ultimo
2024-01-01

Abstract

: Background/Purpose: To investigate the association between the degree of spatial neglect and the changes of brain system segregation (SyS; i.e., the ratio of the extent to which brain networks interact internally and with each other) after stroke. Methods: A cohort of 20 patients with right hemisphere lesion was submitted to neuropsychological assessment as well as to resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging session at acute stage after stroke. The severity of spatial neglect was quantified using the Center of Cancellation (CoC) scores of the Bells cancellation test. For each patient, resting-state functional connectivity (FC) matrices were assessed by implementing a brain parcellation of nine networks that included the visual network, dorsal attention network (DAN), ventral attention network (VAN), sensorimotor network (SMN), auditory network, cingulo-opercular network, language network, frontoparietal network, and default mode network (DMN). For each patient and each network, we then computed the SyS derived by subtracting the between-network FC from the within-network FC (normalized by the within-network FC). Finally, for each network, the CoC scores were correlated with the SyS. Results: The correlational analyses indicated a negative association between CoC and SyS in the DAN, VAN, SMN, and DMN (q < 0.05 false discovery rate [FDR]-corrected). Patients with more severe spatial neglect exhibited lower SyS and vice versa. Conclusion: The loss of segregation in multiple and specific networks provides a functional framework for the deficits in spatial and nonspatial attention and motor/exploratory ability observed in neglect patients. Impact statement In a graph-theoretic framework, we identify a loss of system segregation associative and sensorimotor networks in neglect patients who had suffered from right hemisphere stroke. From a theoretical standpoint, our findings corroborate the working hypothesis that the efficient segregation among brain systems is relevant for executing higher functions such as spatial attention. Clinically, the set of networks that exhibit loss of segregation offers a therapeutic opportunity and can be targets of neuromodulation protocols for neglect rehabilitation.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11564/813892
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