Although previous evidence suggests an association between work ability and burnout, no study has been specifically dedicated at establishing which is the directionality of the relationship between these two important constructs either in educational or in other occupational contexts. Studies shedding light on the directionality of this relationship are essential, as their results may address organizational management and occupational health practitioners in choosing the most proper interventions capable of early interrupting a possible loss spiral initiated by decreased work ability or increased burnout. In view of that, the aim of the present study was to examine the cross-lagged association between work ability and burnout (i.e., exhaustion, enthusiasm toward the job, and cynicism) at a distance of one year. In total, 349 early childhood educators completed a self-report questionnaire at two-time points. Data analyses were performed employing cross-lagged structural equation model (SEM). The findings indicated that work ability positively predicts enthusiasm toward the job and negatively predicts exhaustion. Conversely, work ability did not significantly affect cynicism. Moreover, none of the three-burnout sub-dimensions were found to significantly affect work ability measured at one years of distance. The main contribution of the present study was to have clarified the directionality of the association between work ability and burnout and to have identified the burnout sub-dimensions specifically affected by work ability. From a practical point of view, the present study highlighted the importance of investing in promoting work ability in order to prevent job burnout. © 2019

Work ability and burnout: What comes first? A two-wave, cross-lagged study among early childhood educators

Guidetti G.;
2019

Abstract

Although previous evidence suggests an association between work ability and burnout, no study has been specifically dedicated at establishing which is the directionality of the relationship between these two important constructs either in educational or in other occupational contexts. Studies shedding light on the directionality of this relationship are essential, as their results may address organizational management and occupational health practitioners in choosing the most proper interventions capable of early interrupting a possible loss spiral initiated by decreased work ability or increased burnout. In view of that, the aim of the present study was to examine the cross-lagged association between work ability and burnout (i.e., exhaustion, enthusiasm toward the job, and cynicism) at a distance of one year. In total, 349 early childhood educators completed a self-report questionnaire at two-time points. Data analyses were performed employing cross-lagged structural equation model (SEM). The findings indicated that work ability positively predicts enthusiasm toward the job and negatively predicts exhaustion. Conversely, work ability did not significantly affect cynicism. Moreover, none of the three-burnout sub-dimensions were found to significantly affect work ability measured at one years of distance. The main contribution of the present study was to have clarified the directionality of the association between work ability and burnout and to have identified the burnout sub-dimensions specifically affected by work ability. From a practical point of view, the present study highlighted the importance of investing in promoting work ability in order to prevent job burnout. © 2019
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11564/728798
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