This work aimed to compare the capability of Streptococcus oralis to adhere to a novel surface, double-etched titanium (DAE), in respect to machined and single-etched titanium. The secondary outcome was to establish which topographical features could affect the interaction between the implant surface and bacteria. The samples’ superficial features were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry (EDS), and the wetting properties were tested through sessile methods. The novel surface, the double-etched titanium (DAE), was also analyzed with atomic force microscopy (AFM). S. oralis was inoculated on discs previously incubated in saliva, and then the colony-forming units (CFUs), biomass, and cellular viability were measured at 24 and 48h. SEM observation showed that DAE was characterized by higher porosity and Oxygen (%) in the superficial layer and the measurement of the wetting properties showed higher hydrophilicity. AFM confirmed the presence of a higher superficial nano-roughness. Microbiological analysis showed that DAE discs, coated by pellicle’s proteins, were characterized by significantly lower CFUs at 24 and 48 h with respect to the other two groups. In particular, a significant inverse relationship was shown between the CFUs at 48 h and the values of the wetted area and a direct correlation with the water contact angle. The biomass at 24 h was slightly lower on DAE, but results were not significant concerning the other groups, both at 24 and 48 h. The DAE treatment not only modifies the superficial topography and increased hydrophilicity, but it also increases the Oxygen percentage in the superficial layer, which could contribute to the inhibition of S. oralis adhesion. DAE can be considered a promising treatment for titanium implants to counteract a colonization pioneer microorganism, such as S. oralis.

The bacterial anti-adhesive activity of double-etched titanium (Dae) as a dental implant surface

Petrini M.;Giuliani A.;Di Campli E.;Di Lodovico S.;Iezzi G.;Piattelli A.
;
D'ercole S.
2020-01-01

Abstract

This work aimed to compare the capability of Streptococcus oralis to adhere to a novel surface, double-etched titanium (DAE), in respect to machined and single-etched titanium. The secondary outcome was to establish which topographical features could affect the interaction between the implant surface and bacteria. The samples’ superficial features were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry (EDS), and the wetting properties were tested through sessile methods. The novel surface, the double-etched titanium (DAE), was also analyzed with atomic force microscopy (AFM). S. oralis was inoculated on discs previously incubated in saliva, and then the colony-forming units (CFUs), biomass, and cellular viability were measured at 24 and 48h. SEM observation showed that DAE was characterized by higher porosity and Oxygen (%) in the superficial layer and the measurement of the wetting properties showed higher hydrophilicity. AFM confirmed the presence of a higher superficial nano-roughness. Microbiological analysis showed that DAE discs, coated by pellicle’s proteins, were characterized by significantly lower CFUs at 24 and 48 h with respect to the other two groups. In particular, a significant inverse relationship was shown between the CFUs at 48 h and the values of the wetted area and a direct correlation with the water contact angle. The biomass at 24 h was slightly lower on DAE, but results were not significant concerning the other groups, both at 24 and 48 h. The DAE treatment not only modifies the superficial topography and increased hydrophilicity, but it also increases the Oxygen percentage in the superficial layer, which could contribute to the inhibition of S. oralis adhesion. DAE can be considered a promising treatment for titanium implants to counteract a colonization pioneer microorganism, such as S. oralis.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11564/737881
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