OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study is to identify phase coupling patterns that are shared across subjects via a machine learning approach that utilises source space MEG phase coupling data from a Working Memory (WM) task. Indeed, phase coupling of neural oscillations is putatively a key factor for communication between distant brain areas and it is therefore crucial in performing cognitive tasks, including WM. Previous studies investigating phase coupling during cognitive tasks have often focused on a few a priori selected brain areas or a specific frequency band and the need for data-driven approaches has been recognised. Machine learning techniques have emerged as valuable tools for the analysis of neuroimaging data since they catch fine-grained differences in the multivariate signal distribution. Here, we expect that these techniques applied to MEG phase couplings can reveal WM related processes that are shared across individuals.APPROACH: We analysed WM data collected as part of the Human Connectome Project. The MEG data were collected while subjects (N=83) performed N-back WM tasks in two different conditions, namely 2-back (WM condition) and 0-back (control condition). We estimated phase coupling patterns (Multivariate Phase Slope Index) for both conditions and for theta, alpha, beta, and gamma bands. The obtained phase coupling data were then used to train a linear support vector machine in order to classify which task condition the subject was performing with an across-subject cross-validation approach. The classification was performed separately based on the data from individual frequency bands and with all bands combined (multiband). Finally, we evaluated the relative importance of the different features (phase couplings) for the classification by the means of feature selection probability.MAIN RESULTS: The WM condition and control condition were successfully classified based on the phase coupling patterns in theta (62 % accuracy) and alpha bands (60 % accuracy) separately. Importantly, the multiband classification showed that not only phase coupling patterns in theta and alpha but also in the gamma bands are related to WM processing as testified by improvement in classification performance (71 %).SIGNIFICANCE: Our study successfully decoded working memory tasks using MEG source space functional connectivity. Our approach, combining across-subject classification and a multidimensional metric recently developed by our group, is able to detect patterns of connectivity that are shared across individuals. In other words the results are generalisable to new individuals and allow meaningful interpretation of the task relevant phase coupling patterns.

Decoding working memory task condition using MEG source level long-range phase coupling patterns

Syrjälä, Jaakko Johannes
Primo
;
Basti, Alessio
Secondo
;
Guidotti, Roberto;Marzetti, Laura
Penultimo
;
Pizzella, Vittorio
Ultimo
2021-01-01

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study is to identify phase coupling patterns that are shared across subjects via a machine learning approach that utilises source space MEG phase coupling data from a Working Memory (WM) task. Indeed, phase coupling of neural oscillations is putatively a key factor for communication between distant brain areas and it is therefore crucial in performing cognitive tasks, including WM. Previous studies investigating phase coupling during cognitive tasks have often focused on a few a priori selected brain areas or a specific frequency band and the need for data-driven approaches has been recognised. Machine learning techniques have emerged as valuable tools for the analysis of neuroimaging data since they catch fine-grained differences in the multivariate signal distribution. Here, we expect that these techniques applied to MEG phase couplings can reveal WM related processes that are shared across individuals.APPROACH: We analysed WM data collected as part of the Human Connectome Project. The MEG data were collected while subjects (N=83) performed N-back WM tasks in two different conditions, namely 2-back (WM condition) and 0-back (control condition). We estimated phase coupling patterns (Multivariate Phase Slope Index) for both conditions and for theta, alpha, beta, and gamma bands. The obtained phase coupling data were then used to train a linear support vector machine in order to classify which task condition the subject was performing with an across-subject cross-validation approach. The classification was performed separately based on the data from individual frequency bands and with all bands combined (multiband). Finally, we evaluated the relative importance of the different features (phase couplings) for the classification by the means of feature selection probability.MAIN RESULTS: The WM condition and control condition were successfully classified based on the phase coupling patterns in theta (62 % accuracy) and alpha bands (60 % accuracy) separately. Importantly, the multiband classification showed that not only phase coupling patterns in theta and alpha but also in the gamma bands are related to WM processing as testified by improvement in classification performance (71 %).SIGNIFICANCE: Our study successfully decoded working memory tasks using MEG source space functional connectivity. Our approach, combining across-subject classification and a multidimensional metric recently developed by our group, is able to detect patterns of connectivity that are shared across individuals. In other words the results are generalisable to new individuals and allow meaningful interpretation of the task relevant phase coupling patterns.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11564/742400
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