Worldwide, infertility affects between 10 and 15% of reproductive-aged couples. Female infertility represents an increasing health issue, principally in developing countries, as the current inclinations of delaying pregnancy beyond 35 years of age significantly decrease fertility rates. Female infertility, commonly imputable to ovulation disorders, can be influenced by several factors, including congenital malformations, hormonal dysfunction, and individual lifestyle choices, such as smoking cigarettes, stress, drug use and physical activity. Moreover, diet-related elements play an important role in the regulation of ovulation. Modern types of diet that encourage a high fat intake exert a particularly negative effect on ovulation, affecting the safety of gametes and the implantation of a healthy embryo. Identifying and understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for diet-associated infertility might help clarify the confounding multifaceted elements of infertility and uncover novel, potentially curative treatments. In this view, this systematic revision of literature will summarize the current body of knowledge of the potential effect of high-fat diet (HFD) exposure on oocyte and follicular quality and consequent female reproductive function, with particular reference to molecular mechanisms and pathways. Inflammation, oxidative stress, gene expression and epigenetics represent the main mechanisms associated with mammal folliculogenesis and oogenesis.

A Systematic Review of the Effects of High-Fat Diet Exposure on Oocyte and Follicular Quality: A Molecular Point of View

Di Berardino C.;Stuppia L.;Gatta V.
Ultimo
2022

Abstract

Worldwide, infertility affects between 10 and 15% of reproductive-aged couples. Female infertility represents an increasing health issue, principally in developing countries, as the current inclinations of delaying pregnancy beyond 35 years of age significantly decrease fertility rates. Female infertility, commonly imputable to ovulation disorders, can be influenced by several factors, including congenital malformations, hormonal dysfunction, and individual lifestyle choices, such as smoking cigarettes, stress, drug use and physical activity. Moreover, diet-related elements play an important role in the regulation of ovulation. Modern types of diet that encourage a high fat intake exert a particularly negative effect on ovulation, affecting the safety of gametes and the implantation of a healthy embryo. Identifying and understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for diet-associated infertility might help clarify the confounding multifaceted elements of infertility and uncover novel, potentially curative treatments. In this view, this systematic revision of literature will summarize the current body of knowledge of the potential effect of high-fat diet (HFD) exposure on oocyte and follicular quality and consequent female reproductive function, with particular reference to molecular mechanisms and pathways. Inflammation, oxidative stress, gene expression and epigenetics represent the main mechanisms associated with mammal folliculogenesis and oogenesis.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11564/791053
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